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FareShare Gazette Recipes -- December 2007 - F's

 

FareShare Chat Recipes.
FareShare Gazette Recipes.

 

Recipes Included On This Page

Falafel Balls in Spicy Tomato Sauce - Veg

FareShare Fun Fact: Bananas and Plantains

FareShare Fun Fact: Flavoured Alcohols

FareShare Fun Fact: Papaya

FareShare Fun Fact: Yams or Sweet Potatoes?

FareShare Fun Facts: Sandwiches

Fresh Horseradish with Beets

Fried Feta Squares

Frijoles Refritos (Refried Beans)

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FareShare Gazette Recipes.

 
* Exported from MasterCook *

Falafel Balls in Spicy Tomato Sauce - Veg

Recipe By : Low-Fat and Fast by Joanne Leonard, Vegetarian Times
Serving Size : 6 Preparation Time :0:00
Categories : Volume 10-12 Dec 2007

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
-------- ------------ --------------------------------
Sauce:
28 ounces crushed tomatoes -- (1 can)
1 cup vegetable broth or water
1 small onion -- chopped
1 jalapeno chili -- seeded and minced
1 teaspoon paprika
1/2 teaspoon salt and pepper
Balls:
1 1/3 cups falafel mix
6 ounces Chinese-style soft tofu -- drained and mashed
1/2 cup water
1/2 cup chopped parsley -- plus
extra for garnish
1 egg -- beaten
or equivalent Egg Replacer
1 tablespoon vegetable oil

SAUCE
Combine sauce ingredients in large, heavy pot; bring to a boil. Simmer
uncovered for 15 minutes, stirring occasionally.

BALLS
Preheat oven to 475 degrees F.
In medium bowl, mix all ingredients for balls with your hands. Form into 1-
inch balls. Place on lightly oiled baking sheet; bake for 8 to 10 minutes.
Do not overcook or balls will dry out.

When sauce is done, carefully loosen balls from baking sheet and drop into
simmering sauce.
To serve, garnish with parsley.

Makes 6 servings.

Low-Fat and Fast by Joanne Leonard, Vegetarian Times, Oct, 1996 03.20.06

This dish is good ladled over spaghetti and topped with grated Parmesan
cheese.

Contributed to the FareShare Gazette by Chupa; 27 December 2007.
www.fareshare.net



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Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 85 Calories; 4g Fat (34.3% calories from 
fat); 4g Protein; 12g Carbohydrate; 3g Dietary Fiber; 35mg Cholesterol; 309mg 
Sodium. Exchanges: 0 Grain(Starch); 0 Lean Meat; 2 Vegetable; 1/2 Fat.


 

* Exported from MasterCook *

FareShare Fun Fact: Bananas and Plantains

Recipe By :
Serving Size :   Preparation Time :0:00
Categories : Volume 10-12 Dec 2007

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
-------- ------------ --------------------------------
(See Below)

Bananas and plantains (the 'funny looking' bananas; not the herb that
belongs to a different family entirely) are members of the same family,
Musaceae. This is a fairly large family of plants, some of which are
strictly ornamental, like the Travellers Tree and the Strelitzia (Bird of
Paradise), while others are an important food source. Varieties of Musa
paradisiaca are the main edible bananas seen in most groceries. Musa nana
or dwarf or Chinese banana is another one seen more often these days in
North America markets than it used to be. Banana plants have been taken all
over the world and while they are mainly grown in tropical regions there is
at least one variety that has been grown as far north as southern British
Columbia, Canada, (not in a hothouse; does bear fruit but is not grown
commercially, at least as far as I know).

As with many plants that have become important to us, there is a large
amount of folklore and numerous legends surrounding the banana. Many uses,
aside from food, have been found for the various parts of the plant by
people of many countries: roof material, containers for food and water,
fibers for clothing, medicines, animal feed, decoration. One type of banana
has starchy edible underground stems.

Bananas do not grow on trees; they grow on tall herbaceous plants, often in
clumps. Each plant will have one flower stem, which slowly bends over and
hangs down, from which it produces one stem which may contain as many as
300 individual bananas, after doing this that plant dies. Reproduction is
by shoots that spring up around the base of the plant. Strictly speaking,
bananas and plantains are seedless berries. The longer bananas are curved
because the tip of the fruit grows upward against the force of gravity.

Both bananas and plantains store their energy as starch which is converted
to sugar as they ripen. Bananas undergo quite an amazing change: the
starch-to-sugar ratio of a mature but unripe banana is 25 to 1; this
changes to 1-to-20 in the ripe fruit, meaning that their sugar content
becomes about 20%. By comparison, the sugar content of a ripe plantain is
about 6%. Although they are closely related and in fact, their names are
often used interchangeably, the name banana is generally used to refer to
the sweeter dessert variety. You may come across references to 'cooking'
bananas which mostly means those that are not as sweet and are usually
cooked before eating. Plantains keep their starchy nature and can be cooked
in much the same manner as potatoes. Both have a defensive feature that
causes them to produce brown spots in the unripe fruit but once ripe they
can be stored in the refrigerator and although the skins will turn black
the fruit inside will stay white.

One raw medium size banana weighing 114 grams contains approximately: 105
calories; 84.7 g water; 1.2 g protein; 26.7 g carbohydrates; 1.8 g dietary
fiber; 0.6 g fat; 92 IU Vitamin A; 10 mg Vitamin C; 451 mg potassium; 22 mg
phosphorus.

One cup of cooked plantain slices weighing 154 grams contains
approximately: 179 calories; 103.6 g water; 1.2 g protein; 48.0 g
carbohydrates; 1400 IU Vitamin A; 17 mg Vitamin C; 716 mg potassium; 43 mg
phosphorus.

Contributed to the FareShare Gazette by Hallie; 16 December 2007.
www.fareshare.net



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* Exported from MasterCook *

FareShare Fun Fact: Flavoured Alcohols

Recipe By :
Serving Size :   Preparation Time :0:00
Categories : Volume 10-12 Dec 2007

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
-------- ------------ --------------------------------
(See Below)

The chemistry of alcohol makes it suitable for flavouring with flowers,
fruits, herbs, nuts and spices which can be either soaked in the alcohol or
distilled with it. Here are some examples:

Abricot - apricots
Advocaat - (Dutch) brandy, eggs
Amaretto - almonds
Anisette - anise
Aquavit - caraway seeds
Araq - anise
Boukha - figs
Calvados - apple
Cassis - black currants
Chartreuse - distilled herbs gathered in Alpine regions
Cointreau - orange
Creme de Cacao - chocolate
Creme de menthe - mint
Curacao - orange
Drambui - Scotch whiskey, honey and herbs
Framboise - raspberry
Frangelico - hazelnuts
Gin - juniper berries and other spices often including coriander
Grand Marnier - orange
Kahlua - coffee
Kirsch - cherry
Kislav - watermelon
Kummel - caraway seeds
Limoncello - lemon
Midori - melon
Mirabelle - plum
Nocino - green walnuts
Ouzo - anise
Peppermint schnapps - mint
Pernod - anise
Poire Williams - pear
Quetsch - plum
Raki - anise
Sambuca - elderflowers
Slivovitz - plum
Sloe "gin" - plum
Southern Comfort - bourbon whiskey, peach brandy, peaches
Tia Maria - coffee
Triple Sec - orange
Van der Hum - orange

Contributed to the FareShare Gazette by Hallie; 23 December 2007.
www.fareshare.net



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* Exported from MasterCook *

FareShare Fun Fact: Papaya

Recipe By :
Serving Size :   Preparation Time :0:00
Categories : Volume 10-12 Dec 2007

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
-------- ------------ --------------------------------
(See Below)

Euell Gibbons, in his Beachcomber's Handbook (without which I would hate to
be marooned on a desert island - the book, I mean <G>) wrote that he
considered few fruits more delicious than a "firm but sweet papaya bathed
lightly in lime juice".

This member of the Caricaceae family, Carica papaya, which is known by
several different 'common' names including: papaya, pawpaw, mikana,
milikana, papaia and he'i, is a native of tropical America. As an example
of why common names can cause confusion, in the U.S. the name pawpaw refers
to a different plant entirely, the Asimina triloba (which has small
globular brownish fruits), while in several other countries the name
'pawpaw' refers to what the Americans call the 'papaya'. Yay for botanical
names! All that having been said however, for the purposes of this article
I will call a papaya a papaya (at least until one falls on my head).

A single tree may have as many as 50 fruit in different stages of growth,
some 20 inches long and weighing as much as 20 pounds each. The papaya
ripens from the center; as it ripens it gets softer. This change causes the
fruit to become more aromatic; it also to tastes sweeter, even though the
sugar content stays the same, because the sugars release more easily from
the softer fruit. The dried seeds can be ground and used as a slightly
mustardy seasoning.

Green papayas, which contain more of the protein-digesting enzyme papain
than the ripe fruit, are used in salads and pickles. The presence of this
enzyme also means that papaya can't be made into a jelly unless it is
cooked. Centuries ago peoples in Latin America used to wrap bruised papaya
leaves around meat in order to tenderize it.

There are other species of papaya that can be found in stores; two of them
are: (a) Carica pubescens, which is larger and not as sweet but is richer
in papain and carotenoid pigments; and (b) Carica pentagono (babaco) which
is a hybrid with tart, cream-coloured, seedless flesh.

According to one of my favourite nutritional reference books: 1 medium raw
papaya weighing 304 grams contains approximately: 117 calories, 270g water,
1.9g protein, 29.8g carbohydrates, 2.8g dietary fiber, 6122IU Vitamin A,
188mg Vitamin C, 72mg calcium, 780mg potassium.

Contributed to the FareShare Gazette by Hallie; 2 December 2007.
www.fareshare.net



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* Exported from MasterCook *

FareShare Fun Fact: Yams or Sweet Potatoes?

Recipe By :
Serving Size :   Preparation Time :0:00
Categories : Volume 10-12 Dec 2007

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
-------- ------------ --------------------------------
(See Below)

I yam what I yam - or am I a sweet potato? Hmmmmmm.

Well it appears that if I am a member of the Dioscorea family I am a true
yam; however, if I am an 'American' yam I am really a sweet potato and a
member of the morning glory family (Ipomoea). Still confused? <G>

Yam; Dioscorea species; several members of this family have large edible
starchy tubers which can weigh 100 pounds and there is some evidence that
they may have been cultivated in Asia as long ago as 8000BCE.

Boiled or baked yam in the amount of 58 grams (1/2 cup of cubes) contains
approximately: 79 calories; 47.7 g water; 1 g protein; 18.8 g
carbohydrates; 0.1 g fat; no cholesterol; 0 Vitamin A; 8 mg Vitamin C.

Sweet potato; Ipomoea batata; incorrectly called a yam in a marketing
campaign in the 1930's.

One sweet potato BAKED WITH SKIN in the amount of 114 grams contains
approximately: 118 calories; 83 g water; 2 g protein; 27.7 g carbohydrates;
3.4 g dietary fiber; 0.1 g fat; 24877 IU Vitamin A; 28 mg Vitamin C.

One sweet potato BOILED WITHOUT SKIN in the amount of 164 grams (1/2 cup
mashed) contains approximately: 172 calories; 119.5 g water; 2.7 g protein;
39.8 g carbohydrates; 0.5 g fat; 27968 IU Vitamin A; 28 mg Vitamin C.

Sweet potatoes should not be stored at temperatures below 55F (13C); when
they are exposed to cold temperatures their centers may stay hard, even
when cooked, so don't keep them in the refrigerator or a cold storage room.
Most of them get sweeter during cooking. There are several varieties with
some being dry and starchy and others being moist and sweet. The popular
dark orange variety contains high quantities of beta-carotene.

Contributed to the FareShare Gazette by Hallie; 9 December 2007.
www.fareshare.net



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* Exported from MasterCook *

FareShare Fun Facts: Sandwiches

Recipe By :
Serving Size :   Preparation Time :0:00
Categories : Volume 10-12 Dec 2007

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
-------- ------------ --------------------------------
(See Below)

The popular story about how a sandwich came to be called a sandwich is that
the Earl of Sandwich got hungry while gambling but didn't want to interrupt
his game so he told the server to bring him a couple of slices of bread and
butter with something between them. The definition of a sandwich given in
my copy of New Larousse Gastronomique is: foodstuff composed of two slices
of buttered bread with some edible substance between. Doris McFerran
Townsend in her "The 1,000 Fabulous Sandwiches Cookbook" (1965) says that
there are two kinds of sandwiches - bad and good; according to her way of
thinking the bad one consists of two slices of bread with a slab of meat or
some leftovers slapped in between them while a good one is the product of
time and effort as is all good cooking. (I reckon that might depend on how
hungry you are, what ingredients are available, how much time you have and
whether or not you just love a slab of cold roast whatever between two
slices of buttered bread.) Larousse states that it has long been the custom
in the French countryside to give workers in the fields meals consisting of
meat between two pieces of wholemeal or black bread and in the southwest
parts of France to provide people setting out on a journey with meat
(mostly pork and veal) between two pieces of bread.

Then there is the definition in one of my dictionaries:
sandwich - noun - [after John Montagu, 4th Earl of Sandwich, (1718-1792),
said to have eaten these in order not to leave the gaming table for meals]
1. two or more slices of bread with a filling of meat, fish, eggs,
vegetables etc. between them. 2. anything like a sandwich in arrangement.
verb form - to place or squeeze between two other persons, places or
things.

There is an interesting paragraph at the beginning of the chapter on
sandwiches in my old copy of 'The New Cook Book' of 1905 which I will quote
here: "The good housekeeper is never at a loss for sandwich-filling. If her
larder is depleted of meat, she turns to eggs; if the hens are not
complaisant, there is still the worthy cheese, the goodly cucumber, the
crisp lettuce, the homely cress. Marmalade jam and jelly are generally to
be secured and honey is not always inaccessible. In short, the sandwich is
a joy forever in the subtleness of its interior. Beautiful effects may be
secured in coloring, pink, yellow, green and red sandwiches being very
easily arranged. For a crimson sandwich there is mashed beetroot, for a
vermilion shade tomato catsup, for a deep or lighter yellow, pounded
cheese or egg yolks, and for green, lettuce, cress, parsley and pistachio
nuts. Salmon sandwiches or minced ham are pink and cream cheese white. The
lot may be combined in rainbow effect with great success. Of course one-day
old bread of fine, firm texture is the first consideration. The best of
butter, a little softened so as to spread perfectly, and the most careful
cutting into shape and size exactly."

Contributed to the FareShare Gazette by Hallie; 31 December 2007.
www.fareshare.net




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* Exported from MasterCook *

Fresh Horseradish with Beets

Recipe By : Bon Appetit
Serving Size :   Preparation Time :0:00
Categories : Volume 10-12 Dec 2007

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
-------- ------------ --------------------------------
2 cups horseradish root -- peeled and
cut in 1/2-inch pieces
[about 12 ounces before peeling]
3/4 cup distilled white vinegar
1/2 cup raw beets -- peeled, finely chopped
1/3 cup sugar
1/2 teaspoon coarse salt

Using processor fitted with shredder attachment, shred horseradish.
Transfer horseradish to medium bowl. Fit processor with metal blade. Return
horseradish to work bowl. Add next 3 ingredients. Process until almost
smooth, scraping down sides of bowl occasionally, about 5 minutes. Mix in
salt. Place horseradish in glass jar. Cover tightly; chill at least 1 day
and up to 10 days.

Makes about 2 cups

Source : Bon Appetit (4/95)

---> One thing I've discovered about horseradish is that it starts to lose
its strength almost immediately once you've dug the root so use it as
quickly as you can or be prepared for it to have a much milder taste. It
smells so good when freshly dug (in my yard 'dug' pretty much means you
stick the shovel in about where you want to remove the piece of root then
stand on it and try to sort of jump a few times - no cameras allowed <G> )!
H.

Contributed to the FareShare Gazette by Joan; 24 December 2007.
www.fareshare.net



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* Exported from MasterCook *

Fried Feta Squares

Recipe By : Weekend Magazine's Foodcourt column
Serving Size : 4 Preparation Time :0:00
Categories : Volume 10-12 Dec 2007

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
-------- ------------ --------------------------------
8 slices bread -- edges trimmed
2 cups feta cheese
1 tablespoon parsley -- finely chopped
1/4 teaspoon paprika
1/4 teaspoon dried thyme
1/4 teaspoon dried oregano
1/4 teaspoon black pepper
1/4 teaspoon onion powder
or garlic powder
Oil for frying -- as required

Crumble the feta cheese. Add herbs and spices to feta and mix well. Spread
this mixture onto 4 slices of bread. Cover with the remaining 4 slices to
form 4 sandwiches. Press down firmly. Cut each sandwich into quarters. Seal
the edges of quartered sandwiches with wet hands, pressing and pinching the
edges firmly.
Deep fry in hot oil. Drain on absorbent paper towels.

4 servings.
40 minutes. 20 minutes preparation.

Source : "Charishma Ramchandani for  2007 Recipezaar."
S(MC format by Chupa Babi): "12.17.07"

Contributed to the FareShare Gazette by Chupa; 29 December 2007.
www.fareshare.net



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Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 333 Calories; 18g Fat (48.2% calories from 
fat); 15g Protein; 28g Carbohydrate; 1g Dietary Fiber; 67mg Cholesterol; 1107mg 
Sodium. Exchanges: 1 1/2 Grain(Starch); 1 1/2 Lean Meat; 0 Vegetable; 2 1/2 Fat.


 

* Exported from MasterCook *

Frijoles Refritos (Refried Beans)

Recipe By :
Serving Size : 6 Preparation Time :0:00
Categories : Volume 10-12 Dec 2007

Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
-------- ------------ --------------------------------
2 cups cooked beans
1/2 cup grated Longhorn cheese
3 tablespoons lard
or bacon or other meat drippings

Heat lard or bacon drippings in frying pan or saucepan. Add beans, mash and
simmer for 5 minutes. Top with cheese and serve when melted.

NOTE : this along with green chili and/or salsa is a great burrito filling.

Yields 6 servings.

Contributed to the FareShare Gazette by Joan; 6 December 2007.
www.fareshare.net



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Per Serving (excluding unknown items): 144 Calories; 7g Fat (41.7% calories from 
fat); 5g Protein; 16g Carbohydrate; 3g Dietary Fiber; 6mg Cholesterol; 1mg 
Sodium. Exchanges: 1 Grain(Starch); 1/2 Lean Meat; 1 1/2 Fat.

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